Growing Poblano Ancho chilli peppers

 

The Poblano chilli is one of the mildest of chillies and well deserves the name "Meek & Mild", but it has a subtle flavour and enough of a "bite" to make it a favourite for adding to sauces, sarnies,

Polano Ancho chilli pepper
Poblano Ancho chilli pepper

steaks and lots of other dishes.

 

They are mildly pungent and figure at between 600 to 1,500 on the Scoville Scale - hardly enough to blow your mind when placed against the Naga varieties which head the scale at just over the 1 million mark. This one if not going to jump out and bite you!

Poblano chillies are so easy to grow it's untrue (See below)- and what's more is that they are so prolific a normal family will only need one plant to keep them going for a year.

Poblano chillies are multi stemmed (as are most chilli plants) and they can reach a height of 3 feet or 90 cm and the fruit pods will be from 10cm (4") to 15 cm (6"). The Poblano is dark green in colour and has a very thick skin but eventually ripens to a red so dark as to be nearly black. They are edible at any stage and in any colour.

About Poblano Ancho Chillies


The fruits are called Poblano when they are green and called Ancho when they turn red. Apparently when dried they form a broad, flat, heart-shaped pod which is where the "Ancho" comes in as it means "wide" in Spanish.

 

Growing Poblano Ancho Chillies


All the books say sow from mid February to mid June but up here in the Midlands we have to disregard the book and sow according to the weather, so mine go in mid to late January. sow them as you would any other chilli, individually in a seed tray of good moist compost. Do not plant them deeply as chilli seeds only have enough reserves to make it to the light through about 3 mm of soil/compost.


Cover them with a clear top to let in sunlight and keep them warm. Re-pot when the second leaves appear into 3" pots. You will need to re-pot again into an 8" or 9" pot when thee plant is more mature.