Chilli pepper Inferno

 

The inferno is a moderately hot chilli which won't burn your mouth parts (too much), and it prefers to grow in rich soil or a good compost in a full sun position. If you buy the seeds they will most probably cost you circa 3.99 or less for 10, so you need to take the greatest care with these seeds in case some don't germinate.

Chilli pepper Inferno

 

In fact there is a distinct probability that some seeds won't germinate if you don't have the right conditions such as an electric propagator or the windowsill of a nicely heated room.

 

Your chilli seeds need heat, light, water and oxygen, and given those few elements they will thrive, but if all you have are the basic requirements of an unheated room you need to be aware that up to 50% of your seeds will rot before germination.


Growing Chilli Pepper Inferno from seedChilli Inferno, packed with seeds


I place mine on the surface of a good, free-draining, damp compost and cover with a fine sprinkling of  more compost or vermiculite. Place seed trays in a propagator at a temperature of 18-25C (64-77F) until after germination, which takes 7-10 days.The inferno is one of the first chillies to germinate - we have found that the Paper Lantern is the first, closely followed by the Inferno


Don't despair if you don't have a propagator as you can still grow your chillies but they will take longer. The best I can say is to give the seeds plenty of insulation such as heavy bubble wrap domed over the seed tray so the individual modules containing your seeds can see daylight.


Keep checking on them to see they don't dry out, in fact, keep them moist but not soaking wet.


When seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant into individual 7.5cm (3") pots of good compost and grow on from there. You will need to re-pot again before the plant fully matures and I use 8" or 9" pots for this variety.


Your mature plants will love sunshine but not too much direct heat or you will be forever watering them. Chillies are thirsty beasties at the best of times.


Most seed companies talk of putting the mature plants outside in sheltered areas but I personally never do that because when grown outside the crop is barely 50% of a similar plant grown in a greenhouse or conservatory.